U.S. to revise terror alert system, says Homeland Security

1
jeh johnson homeland security secretary

After President Barack Obama’s discourse about the state of the nation and his comments on the current situation, the administration decided to implement new changes to the terror alert system in the next days, according to Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, cited by Nola.com.

The updated system would better inform citizens about threats to the United States, but, unfortunately, these were the only details given for the moment. This marks the third times when Homeland Security issues a warning about security concerns since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

There was no need to use the National Terrorism Advisory System yet

Jeh Johnson made the announcement about the new alert system during a forum with Defense One magazine, claiming that the National Terrorism Advisory System hasn’t been used due to the lack of a “specific, credible threat”. As for the new system, it will feature an “intermediate” step, he added.

On the other side, Josh Earnest, White House spokesman, said on Monday that Homeland Security won’t replace the system, but rather make it more effective.

“You should not consider this a replacement of this program, but rather some important reforms of the program that would allow it to be more effectively used to communicate with the American public,” Earnest told the media.

The measures were taken after the San Bernardino shootings

The change comes in the wake of the recent shootings from San Bernardino, California, where Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik, two Muslim citizens, inspired by the Islamic State group, killed 14 people attending an event at a social services facility.

Even though the unfortunate event wasn’t classified as a terrorist attack yet, the threat for Islamic radicals is a growing concern, since similar attacks may not be discovered in advance, said Jeh Johnson.

“We need a system that adequately informs the public at large … about what we are seeing, what we are doing and what we are asking the public to do about it,” the Homeland Security Secretary added.